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Anterior vs Posterior

The anterior and posterior chains are two essential muscle groups in the human body that play a critical role in our physical movements. The anterior chain comprises muscles located on the front side of the body, while the posterior chain consists of muscles located on the backside. The anterior chain includes muscles such as the quadriceps, abdominals, and pectorals, while the posterior chain comprises muscles such as the glutes, hamstrings, and back muscles.


It is essential to maintain a balance between the anterior and posterior chains to avoid imbalances. The selection of lifts that comprise the 12 training blocks within The Lift League has been carefully selected to give you the most well-rounded, progressive training program possible. The Lift League training system strikes the perfect balance between anterior and posterior movements.


Both the anterior and posterior chains are essential in maintaining proper posture, balance, and overall strength. However, imbalances between these two muscle groups can lead to poor posture, increased risk of injury, and reduced athletic performance.


For instance, a strong anterior chain without a corresponding strong posterior chain can result in poor posture, as the body tends to lean forward. It can also lead to an increased risk of knee injuries, as the quadriceps, which are part of the anterior chain, can pull the patella out of alignment. On the other hand, a strong posterior chain without a corresponding strong anterior chain can also lead to poor posture, as the body tends to lean backward. It can also lead to an increased risk of lower back injuries, as the back muscles may be overworked.


It is important to incorporate exercises that target both muscle groups in a training program to achieve balance. Engaging in a balanced training program that targets both muscle groups can help to improve posture, reduce the risk of injury, and enhance athletic performance.

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